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3DCeram and the SPCTS (UMR CNRS/Universite Limoges) are renewing their partnership and will continue their technological research for the future of 3D ceramic printing.


Publié le 9 March 2017

Limoges (Nouvelle Aquitaine, 8 March 2017) – 3Dceram and the SPCTS (UMR CNRS/Université de Limoges) have signed a new 3 year collaboration agreement that will allow them to jointly tackle issues relating to additive manufacturing and to plan for the future of 3D ceramic printing. This agreement will see the continuation of a partnership that was first launched in 2010 with the laboratory for the Science of Ceramic Processes and Surface Treatment (SPCTS).
This cooperation agreement underscores the strong ties between 3DCeram and the SPCTS that were initially forged by Thierry Chartier, CNRS Research supervisor. These collaborative projects come to fruition with the development of innovative materials and processes as well as the filing of shared patents. It should be noted that the SPCTS and 3DCeram are both members of the European H2020 “Friendship” project, organised by the SPCTS (Fabrice Rossignol).
This new dynamic will make it possible to carry out work on projects involving 3D Ceramic processes, with the aim of sustaining and sharing the SPCTS’s unique expertise and industrialising printing and additive manufacturing processes based on laser stereolithography, while supporting a booming market.
The upstream work on laser stereolithography undertaken by Thierry Chartier, CNRS Research Supervisor at the laboratory for the Science of Ceramic Processes and Surface Treatment (SPCTS) in Limoges, has made a significant contribution to the development of ceramic additive manufacturing technology that 3DCeram has been able to transform into production technology (an on demand production service). This innovative process makes it possible to quickly develop geometric shapes, ranging from the simplest to the most complex.
A range of different formulations have already been developed in order to meet the main uses of ceramics (alumina, zirconia, hydroxylapatite, etc.). To this we can add made-to-measure formulations, depending on the design brief.